Testing for Illnesses With an ELISA Kit

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Elisa-KitsWhen you go to a doctor’s office or hospital and need tests done, you probably expect to get the results as soon as possible. ELISA test kits are often used to determine if there are certain antibodies in the blood. There are numerous illnesses and conditions that can be diagnosed when this kind of test is used. The test is easy to do as it’s a simple blood test with the blood being examined in a lab. If anything is found after the tests are preformed, then the doctor can be alerted so that treatments can begin.

HIV is a disease that an ELISA kit will test for as well as other sexually transmitted diseases. It’s important to know if you have any of these conditions so that you can alert your partner as to what you have. The partner might now know of having the condition. If you like being outside, you will likely see that there are insects that can bite you. Some of these insects transfer diseases. An ELISA kit will help in diagnosing Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Lyme disease and other illnesses that can be spread by insects.

If you notice that you have little energy or that you don’t want to eat as much, then you might be anemic. This kind of test can alert doctors if there is anything wrong with the blood count, which could be a sign of anemia. It is also sometimes used to determine if someone has cancer or if there might be a tumor. If there are any issues with the blood levels being too low or too high, then the doctor can order further testing to see what else might be going on in the body. Toxoplasmosis is another condition that can be diagnosed by looking at the antibodies in the blood.

Another thing to keep in mind is that just because you have the antibodies in your system doesn’t mean that you currently have the illness. It could mean that you have had the illness in the past with the antibodies still being present in the body.

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